The Selfie-Stick Madness

I get it. Really, I do. As a millennial and self-prescribed hipster, I enjoy the photo as much as anyone else. But the selfie stick is on a whole new level. It’s basically the extended arm of self-absorption. It’s a tool for people who are just trying to outdo themselves online and using selfie-sticks as the catalyst for promotion.  I mean, we’ve all taken selfies (including myself), but we really need awareness and support to end the selfie-stick madness.

And honestly, being a big deal online is like, having a ton of money in monopoly.

Even the Smithsonian isn’t having it. They’ve recently issued a ban to unsuspecting tourists and wannabe narcissiSelfie Collagestic enthusiasts: No selfie sticks. The Louvre in Paris hasn’t taken action yet, so if you want to grab a selfie with Mona using your stick, now’s your chance.

Side note: With all this going on, how the heck did Kodak go bankrupt? Seriously.

Anyways, at Blanchard we have launched a new campaign around connectedness and collaboration. “We is the new me”.  We are using the “USIE” (apparently the new word for a group selfie) to express that and share amongst colleagues. I think “groupie” sounds more appropriate for this new phenomenon, but apparently a few women in the 60’s beat us to the punch. We even have the virtual group selfie. I’m calling it the Velfie.

Regardless of all of these shenanigans, what we really want is to share our story, connect with others, and dialogue about ways to be collaborative and connected at work in a meaningful way. How do we really collaborate across cross-functional teams and provide productive and meaningful results? A recent large study confirmed that people with more friends and connections are generally happier, healthier, and better off, and that happiness spreads through social networks. Social connections can also influence and discourage potentially harmful behavior such as smoking. Research suggests creating a healthy connection with influences that are constructive and positive. Good health, employment, and feeling safe and secure all increase people’s chances of developing positive social networks that help improve our lives.

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